The internet of things is a building block for the Physical Graph

Google is working on the Knowledge graph, collecting all the worlds information in one easy accesable database that can provide answers to all questions. Facebook on the other hand is building the Social Graph, a data string with interconnected identities and social interactions. The internet of things is all about building the physical graph, a data string with interconnected objects and machine2machine- and human-computer interactions.

First question: who will own it? It seems plausible to me that we will have more than one internet of things. An ioT by Apple with Apple products, one from Google etc. If appstores are any hint there are ‘walled gardens’ coming to the internet of things. More on this in other articles I am currently working on.

For now a easier question: what will feed the physical graph with data? A lot of devices. Check out this infographic providing a timeline of devices coming online all the way back to the sixties. But it’s not all about the devices: it’s also about our interactions with the data and the interactions between the devices itself. Those three pillars will form the physical graph (click on the image to enlarge).

 

About Thomas van Manen

Thomas van Manen is a researcher with a focus on the impact of new technologies and is part of the VINT research program on Big Data, Internet of Things, Gamification, Wearables and Disruptive Technologies. As a innovator Thomas helps organizations translate new technologies and digital trends into ideas and ideas into concepts using research, workshops and pilot programs. Thomas is also Chief Editor of the VINT research blog, part of Sogeti Labs community of technology experts and was voted to be part of the HOT100 in 2012, a yearly selection of the most promising alumni in Media & Arts studies.

 

Comments

  1. The unfortunate thing is that if the Social Internet is any indicator we are likely to get a series of disconnected network siloes which choose to be isolated walled gardens. We only have to look at the infighting between Facebook, Google+, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and the lack of w3c standards around graph interoperability.

    The other frustration (for me as a data scientist) is that these 3 networks (knowledge, social, and physical) need to be “connect-able” in order for us to be able to derive the greatest insight & value from them. The whole thing is a sorry state of affairs.

  2. Is it a graph or a network? is there a difference? :) I think in approach there is.. and what knowledge is stored/can be retrieved.

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