Posts by Sander Duivestein

About Sander Duivestein

Sander Duivestein is trendwatcher at VINT, the International Research Institute of Sogeti. He is an analyst, publick speaker and internet entrepeneur. Prior, Sander was a software architect at Capgemini. He is co-author of the books: “Me the Media”, “Collaboration in the Cloud”, “Don’t Be Evil” and “The App Effect”. Currently he is writing a book about Big Data: “Recorded Future”.


Phone number: +31 (0)6 250 260 20

 

The Four Pillars of a Decentralized Society

“What if we could rebuild our society in a way that works for everyone? Epochal changes are now underway that are radically transforming how society operates. Johann Gevers will describe this revolution, and how it will create vast new economic opportunities and unprecedented social freedom.”

The End Game of the Sharing Economy

“Airbnb does business in 34,000 cities, has a valuation of over 10 billion dollars, and in a very short time has disrupted the world of hospitality and travel. Its co-founder and CEO Brian Chesky envisions the future city as a place where sharing is front and center — where people become micro-entrepreneurs, the local mom and pops will flourish once again, where space isn’t wasted, but shared, and more of almost everything is produced, except waste. But the journey from here to there won’t be all smooth sailing. What are the ups and downs of the sharing economy, as businesses like Airbnb confront critiques about regulation, economic development, and fairness? What role might businesses play in creating more shareable, more livable cities? How will the sharing economy, with its de-emphasis on ownership, be a tool for addressing urban inequality?”

Shift Happens: Did You Know 2014

Interesting facts about Information Technology (IT) evolution and the changes in society.

Wall Huggers

How addicted are you?

Top 10 Future Trends 2014

Nice slidedeck about future trends with lots of business cases.

Apple and the Internet of Things

“Today is the seventh anniversary of the very first iPhone release and Apple is celebrating it with a new ad touting the device’s role in the Internet of Things and its ability to support parenting and foster family interaction. Showcased in the spot are all manner of family-friendly peripherals: the WiThings baby monitor, the Belkin WeMo plug, the ProScope Micro Mobile microscope, the Tractive GPS dog collar, the Kinsa thermometer and Parrot’s Flower Power wireless sensor for plants, as well as a bunch of related apps.”

Also read the article on Re/code.

Hexo+ Your Autonomous Aerial Camera

HEXO+ is an intelligent drone that follows and films you autonomously. Aerial filming for everyone.

Algorithm That Creates Your Last Will

“When we die, we rely on wills to distribute our assets. It’s intrinsically a subjective experience–we choose who deserves what–but imagine if we removed all that messy human emotion from the equation and instead left our inheritances to a computer algorithm.”

Read the complete article here.

The Corporation of Me

“Jennifer Lyn Morone, Inc is a new business, established to determine the value of an individual. The corporation derives value from three sources and legally protects and bestows rights upon the total output of Jennifer Lyn Morone:

1. Past experiences and present capabilities. These are offered as biological, physical and mental services such as genes, labour, creativity, blood, sweat and tears.
2. Selling future potential in the form of shares.
3. Accumulation, categorisation and evaluation of data that is generated as a result of Jennifer Lyn Morone’s life.

Currently, we do not own our identity nor control our data shadows that are created and captured by modern technology and sold for profit by governments and industry. Establishing a human as a corporation allows assets to be sold and data becomes company property. In this way, the whole process of resources, production and ownership is rightly reclaimed by the individual.”

Visit the website of Jennifer Lyn Morone or read the article in the Economist.

Make Longer Cables

“Two in three robots think their work is boring”